Heartworm Special

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Heartworm test - treatment

We are focusing on Heartworm this month and want to remind you to have your animals tested for heartworm and we highly recommend preventatives. This nasty, invasive parasite is introduced usually through a mosquito bite. The treatment is not pleasant for owner or pet. We recommend regular testing and medication to prevent heartworm in the first place. read more →

TTA Now Available

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Tibial Tuberosity Advancement (TTA)

Tibial Tuberosity Advancement (TTA)

TTA is an orthopedic procedure to repair deficient cranial cruciate ligaments in dogs.

Learn more about TTA

MMP uses a wedge-shaped implant of titanium OrthoFoam™ which both defines the degree of advancement of the tibial tuberosity and holds the bone in its new place while the bony ingrowth that provides permanent biomechanically robust fixation, develops.

Introducing K-Laser for Pain Management

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K Laser for dog pain management and recovery

We are so excited to introduce the K-Laser

It has versatile applications and gives you some new opportunities to better treat your pet’s condition.

Applications for laser therapy include:

• Treatment of arthritis, degenerative joint disease, or hip dysplasia

• General pain management (sprains, strains, and stiffness)

• Post-surgery healing (spays, neuters, declaws, and other surgeries)

• Skin problems (hot spots, lick granulomas, infections)

• Dental procedures

• Fractures and wounds (bites, abrasions, and lesions)

• Ear infections

Learn more about K-Laser

Congratulations Chris, now RVT

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Chris C. Registered Veterinary Technician

Congratulations Chris!! We are so proud of you for passing the NM State Board Exam! Chris is now a Registered Vet Technician!!

Fear FREE Certified Professionals

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Fear Free Certified professional

Several of our team members have gone through the Fear Free Certified Professional program for Albuquerque Veterinarians. We have adopted a culture of Fear FREE medicine in the clinic and try to add a little TLC into every interaction we have with your pet.

What is Fear Free?

Utilization of Fear Free methods and protocols leads to better healthcare outcomes, satisfied clients and relaxed patients. It also reduces or removes anxiety triggers, which creates an experience that is rewarding and safer for all involved, including your pet(s), you and your veterinary healthcare team.

collie-w-treatsStress can start at home. We encourage you to check out our check-lists to insure that you are doing everything possible to start on the right foot.

Tips for Dogs

Tips for Cats

we practice fear free veterinary medicine

Tips for Cat Owners for Fear Free Veterinary Care

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Preparing your pet for their visit to the Vet

Tips for Cat Owners

  1. We recommend purchasing a carrier that opens from the top and/or has an easily removable top. Pulling or dumping a scared cat from a carrier is stressful.
  2. Place the carrier in a central area of the home at least 3 days prior to your visit. Wipe the carrier with pheromone wipes (Feliway) and place their bed, treats and toys inside. For best results, try keeping the carrier in a quiet location in your home all year round!
  3. When carrying the carrier, use both hands to prevent your cat from being jostled and unbalanced.
  4. When driving, make sure the carrier stays flat and doesn’t tip over.
  5. Cover the carrier to reduce stimuli.
  6. Avoid loud music on the ride over and the way home. Instead, play calming classical music to decrease anxiety.
  7. Speak in a low, calm voice. High pitched praise or reaffirmation often increases anxiety.
  8. If you must wait in the waiting room, face the carrier away from other cats present and place your cat on the seat next to you or on your lap. Never on the floor.
  9. On the day of your visit, if your appointment is in the morning, don’t feed your cat breakfast. If they are hungry, your cat will respond better to food rewards at the veterinary hospital. Cats experience similar endorphin release when eating, like people! (does not apply to diabetic cats.)
  10. If you believe your cat would benefit from an anti-anxiety medication or a natural soothing supplement, please let us know as soon as you arrive.

We hope this helps lessen stress for you and your pet.

we practice fear free veterinary medicine

Subcutaneous Fluids – SQ Fluids for your Cat

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Welcome to TLC Pet Hospital’s Kitty Corner. In this video, we learn how to administer SQ Fluids to your feline friend. In this video, we take you step by step through delivering fluids and medication with needle and fluid bag. As part of your at home care for your animal, you may need to administer fluids to your cat or dog. Tent the skin between the shoulder blades. Insert the needle, and open fluids valve. Release fluids into the animal. Close and hold skin in a pinch to keep fluids from draining out. A lump may occur where the fluids are gathered. Replace needle cap.

Bringing Home a New Cat for the First time?

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Did you just Adopt a Cat? You need to be prepared. Learn what to do when you are getting a new cat and bringing it home for the first time.
Like a good Scout, Be prepared should be your motto when bringing a new pet into your home. Felines are sensitive to new surroundings and some may hide under a bed or in a closet for days and sometimes even weeks until they feel comfortable with where they landed. You can help your new cat adapt more easily by following these guidelines:

What To Expect – The First 30 

Be Sure To Prepare Before You Bring Your Cat Home:

Cat hiding in a box with round hole

Your Cat May Hide Out for a While

Cats are territorial, and coming into a new environment leaves them feeling unsettled. There are some many unknowns, and they don’t know what may lurk there. Provide a small area to call his own for the first few days or weeks. Put in the space all of the kitty essentials, such as food, water and a litter box. Spend time with your cat, so make sure there’s a comfortable place for you to sit as well.

Fill a litter box with one or two inches of litter and place it in his room where he can use it undisturbed. Set up a feeding station with food and water bowls. Locate it away from the litter box.

“A new cat may hideout for days or weeks before they are comfortable with their new environment.”

Look at your house with a curious cat’s eye view for its climbing and exploring potential. When your cat is acclimated to your home, you may be surprised to find him on top of the upper kitchen cabinets, so make sure there’s nothing on display there or on other high shelves that can be damaged or knocked off. Look for holes or registers that leave ductwork accessible and cover them up. A kitten can easily slither into one of these. Bone up on how to introduce your cat to other pets. Keep her door closed and don’t let your other pets race in unexpectedly.


First Day:

Now, you’re ready to bring your cat home. Preferably, bring him or her home in a cat carrier. It will feel safer to her. Take her directly to her new room.Generally, you should restrict her exposure to the whole family, but of course, everyone is going to want to see the new pet. Remind them of the ground rules you’ve set up.

Sit on the floor and let her come to you. Don’t force her. Just let her get acquainted on her own time. If she doesn’t approach, leave her alone and try again later. Some cats are particularly frightened, and she may retreat to her hidey hole and not come out when you’re around at all. She may only come out at night when the house is quiet. Give her time.

Your newly adopted cat may not eat much or at all at first. It’s best to give your cat the same food she had at the shelter or in her foster home, at least at first. Keeping some things familiar will make her feel more secure. Be sure to change her water frequently and make sure that she is drinking. If your cat hasn’t eaten for a few days, call your vet to ask for advice.

Learn More

Hyperthyroidism

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What is hyperthyroidism?

Hyperthyroidism is the most common glandular disorder in cats. It is caused by an excessive concentration of circulating thyroxine—a thyroid hormone better known as T4—in the bloodstream.

What are the symptoms of hyperthyroidism? read more →

Aging

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How Do I Know When My Cat Is a “Senior”?

Most cats enter their golden years between 12 and 14 years of age. Many cats, especially those who are black, experience a graying of their coat as they age—but there are other, more subtle signs that your cat is aging. read more →