It’s Spoil Your Dog Day!

spoil your dog day

SPOIL YOUR DOG DAY

August 10th is Spoil Your Dog Day. Remember to keep the treats healthy. You can also spoil them with lots of affection and a good long walk!

Fireworks Friendly

Don’t forget to find a safe and quiet place for your pets, especially if they get nervous around fireworks. Be aware of the presence of pets at all times if you are shooting off fireworks.

Hot Pavement, No Dogs Allowed

Hot Pavement doesn't require hot temperatures

Hot Pavement Doesn’t Require Hot Temperatures

Don’t go out for walks once it gets past 80 degrees. Especially on dark pavement, but gravel trails get just as hot under the New Mexico sun.

Make sure that you have plenty of water for you and your pet. Continue reading

Lyme Disease Prevention Month

It is Lyme Disease Awareness and Prevention

Lyme Disease can have serious negative effects in animals and humans. Long term effects include neurological damage. Here is the link to a fact sheet and crossword puzzle for the kids:

Crossword Puzzle

“Lyme disease is the most common vector-borne disease in the United States. Lyme disease is caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi and rarely, Borrelia mayonii. It is transmitted to humans through the bite of infected blacklegged ticks. Typical symptoms include fever, headache, fatigue, and a characteristic skin rash called erythema migrans. If left untreated, infection can spread to joints, the heart, and the nervous system. Lyme disease is diagnosed based on symptoms, physical findings (e.g., rash), and the possibility of exposure to infected ticks.”

https://www.cdc.gov/lyme/

Tips for Dog Owners for Fear Free Veterinary Care

Preparing your pet for their visit to the Vet

Tips for Dog Owners

  1. aging-dog-and-what-to-doWe recommend purchasing a harness or fixed length leash. This allows more control during what can be a somewhat anxious visit.
  2. Condition them early to enjoy car rides. Start with short drives around the neighborhood. Feed treats and make the experience happy and positive. Add more and more time as they get used to it. If they ever get anxious, stop and try again another day.
  3. On the day of your visit, if their appointment is in the morning, don’t feed them breakfast, and if your appointment is in the afternoon, only feed a small breakfast. If hungry, your dog will respond better to food rewards at the veterinary hospital. Dogs experience similar endorphin release when eating, like people! Does not apply to diabetic dogs.
  4. Bring in their favorite treat, kibble or toy. You are the best at knowing what your dogs go crazy over!
  5. Avoid loud music on the ride over and on the way home. Instead play calming, classical music to decrease anxiety.
  6. Speak in a low calm voice. High pitched praise or reaffirmation often increases anxiety.
  7. If you have an anxious dog, leave them in the car when you arrive and check in with the receptionist. They will advise you when an exam room is available. You can wait in your car, take a walk or sit outside on our bench. Limiting time in the waiting room creates a calmer visit.
  8. If you believe your dog would benefit from an anti-anxiety medication or a natural soothing supplement, please let us know as you arrive.

    We hope this helps lessen stress for you and your pet.

we practice fear free veterinary medicine

 

You Should Never Feed Your Pets…

Chocolate, Coffee, Caffeine: These products all contain substances called methylxanthines, which are found in cacao seeds. Methylxanthines can cause vomiting and diarrhea, panting, excessive thirst and urination, hyperactivity, abnormal heart rhythm, tremors, seizures and even death. Darker chocolate and baking chocolate is more dangerous than milk chocolate.Continue reading

Tricks Not Treats – Halloween No, Nos

  • No Chocolate. Dogs can be made extremely ill by chocolate. Signs may include hyperactivity and vomiting.
  • Pit bull Awareness Day October 26th, 2016.
  • National Cat Day October 29th, 2016.

Welcome to TLC Pet Hospital. Keep your pets safe this Halloween. Keep them away from candy and wrappers. Make sure you have a doggie treat just for them.

KEEP THE TREATS AWAY FROM DOGGIES

Smiling black halloween cat in purple witch hat.

Treats, Wrappers and Especially CHOCOLATE need to stay out of dog’s reach to help avoid tummy trouble or an emergency visit to the Vet!

A Quiet Place

If your dog gets anxious around a lot of activity, find a safe quiet place for your pet to be. Soft music and low light can help calm your pet. Make sure they have their toys and blanket.

A Safe Distance

To keep dogs and cats out of trouble, keep them away from the front door either by getting them out of the way or even using a baby/doggie gate to keep them away from trick or treaters. It’s also a good idea to keep cats inside during Halloween, lest they be caught up in mischief.

Keep the Treats Away From Doggies

Halloween candy tips for dogs

Treats, Wrappers and Especially CHOCOLATE need to stay out of dog’s reach to help avoid tummy trouble or an emergency visit to the Vet!

A Quiet Place

If your dog gets anxious around a lot of activity, find a safe quiet place for your pet to be. Soft music and low light can help calm your pet. Make sure they have their toys and blanket.

A Safe Distance

To keep dogs and cats out of trouble, keep them away from the front door either by getting them out of the way or even using a baby/doggie gate to keep them away from trick or treaters. It’s also a good idea to keep cats inside during Halloween, lest they be caught up in mischief.

World Rabies Day 9-28-19

World Rabies Day

While rabies is a 100% preventable disease, more than 59,000 people die from the disease around the world each year. World Rabies Day is an opportunity to reflect on our efforts to control this deadly disease and remind ourselves that the fight is not yet over.

cdc.gov/worldrabiesday/

We want to let you know that if you have questions about rabies, its affects and treatments, you can consult your veterinarians here at TLC Pet Hospital. Rabies is a serious disease, only animals who have been vaccinated prior to exposure are treatable. Unvaccinated animals are euthanized.

Dogs, Cats, and Ferrets

Dogs, cats, and ferrets that are currently vaccinated with a USDA-licensed rabies vaccine should be revaccinated immediately, kept under the owner’s control, and observed for 45 days. If the animal under observation develops any signs of illness, it should be evaluated by a veterinarian.

CDC – Caring for animals with exposure