Cold Cats

cold cat

Cat Gets Cold

Parks it under your vehicle. If you have an indoor/outdoor cat, chances are they have their favorite spots. In the garage may be one of them during the cold winter months. That means your car is a prime target for a snuggle spot.

If your cat frequents the garage make sure to find out where the are before you pull out the car. They may be on top of a tire or perched near a warm part under the vehicle.

Tips for Cat Owners for Fear Free Veterinary Care

Preparing your pet for their visit to the Vet

Tips for Cat Owners

  1. We recommend purchasing a carrier that opens from the top and/or has an easily removable top. Pulling or dumping a scared cat from a carrier is stressful.
  2. Place the carrier in a central area of the home at least 3 days prior to your visit. Wipe the carrier with pheromone wipes (Feliway) and place their bed, treats and toys inside. For best results, try keeping the carrier in a quiet location in your home all year round!
  3. When carrying the carrier, use both hands to prevent your cat from being jostled and unbalanced.
  4. When driving, make sure the carrier stays flat and doesn’t tip over.
  5. Cover the carrier to reduce stimuli.
  6. Avoid loud music on the ride over and the way home. Instead, play calming classical music to decrease anxiety.
  7. Speak in a low, calm voice. High pitched praise or reaffirmation often increases anxiety.
  8. If you must wait in the waiting room, face the carrier away from other cats present and place your cat on the seat next to you or on your lap. Never on the floor.
  9. On the day of your visit, if your appointment is in the morning, don’t feed your cat breakfast. If they are hungry, your cat will respond better to food rewards at the veterinary hospital. Cats experience similar endorphin release when eating, like people! (does not apply to diabetic cats.)
  10. If you believe your cat would benefit from an anti-anxiety medication or a natural soothing supplement, please let us know as soon as you arrive.

We hope this helps lessen stress for you and your pet.

we practice fear free veterinary medicine

Tips for Dog Owners for Fear Free Veterinary Care

Preparing your pet for their visit to the Vet

Tips for Dog Owners

  1. aging-dog-and-what-to-doWe recommend purchasing a harness or fixed length leash. This allows more control during what can be a somewhat anxious visit.
  2. Condition them early to enjoy car rides. Start with short drives around the neighborhood. Feed treats and make the experience happy and positive. Add more and more time as they get used to it. If they ever get anxious, stop and try again another day.
  3. On the day of your visit, if their appointment is in the morning, don’t feed them breakfast, and if your appointment is in the afternoon, only feed a small breakfast. If hungry, your dog will respond better to food rewards at the veterinary hospital. Dogs experience similar endorphin release when eating, like people! Does not apply to diabetic dogs.
  4. Bring in their favorite treat, kibble or toy. You are the best at knowing what your dogs go crazy over!
  5. Avoid loud music on the ride over and on the way home. Instead play calming, classical music to decrease anxiety.
  6. Speak in a low calm voice. High pitched praise or reaffirmation often increases anxiety.
  7. If you have an anxious dog, leave them in the car when you arrive and check in with the receptionist. They will advise you when an exam room is available. You can wait in your car, take a walk or sit outside on our bench. Limiting time in the waiting room creates a calmer visit.
  8. If you believe your dog would benefit from an anti-anxiety medication or a natural soothing supplement, please let us know as you arrive.

    We hope this helps lessen stress for you and your pet.

we practice fear free veterinary medicine

 

You Should Never Feed Your Pets…

Chocolate, Coffee, Caffeine: These products all contain substances called methylxanthines, which are found in cacao seeds. Methylxanthines can cause vomiting and diarrhea, panting, excessive thirst and urination, hyperactivity, abnormal heart rhythm, tremors, seizures and even death. Darker chocolate and baking chocolate is more dangerous than milk chocolate.Continue reading

Tricks Not Treats – Halloween No, Nos

  • No Chocolate. Dogs can be made extremely ill by chocolate. Signs may include hyperactivity and vomiting.
  • Pit bull Awareness Day October 26th, 2016.
  • National Cat Day October 29th, 2016.

Welcome to TLC Pet Hospital. Keep your pets safe this Halloween. Keep them away from candy and wrappers. Make sure you have a doggie treat just for them.

KEEP THE TREATS AWAY FROM DOGGIES

Smiling black halloween cat in purple witch hat.

Treats, Wrappers and Especially CHOCOLATE need to stay out of dog’s reach to help avoid tummy trouble or an emergency visit to the Vet!

A Quiet Place

If your dog gets anxious around a lot of activity, find a safe quiet place for your pet to be. Soft music and low light can help calm your pet. Make sure they have their toys and blanket.

A Safe Distance

To keep dogs and cats out of trouble, keep them away from the front door either by getting them out of the way or even using a baby/doggie gate to keep them away from trick or treaters. It’s also a good idea to keep cats inside during Halloween, lest they be caught up in mischief.

Keep the Treats Away From Doggies

Halloween candy tips for dogs

Treats, Wrappers and Especially CHOCOLATE need to stay out of dog’s reach to help avoid tummy trouble or an emergency visit to the Vet!

A Quiet Place

If your dog gets anxious around a lot of activity, find a safe quiet place for your pet to be. Soft music and low light can help calm your pet. Make sure they have their toys and blanket.

A Safe Distance

To keep dogs and cats out of trouble, keep them away from the front door either by getting them out of the way or even using a baby/doggie gate to keep them away from trick or treaters. It’s also a good idea to keep cats inside during Halloween, lest they be caught up in mischief.

National Pet Month

We are celebrating National Pet Month. They come in all shapes and sizes and now TLC Pet Hospital accepts more kinds of pets than ever. If you are looking for a dedicated team of professionals who focus on Fear Free veterinarian practices, then celebrate pet month with a visit to the vet.

Introducing Acupunture

Acupuncture for your pets?

YES! Dr. Gutierrez is available to provide acupuncture to your pet to help with a variety of issues. Acupuncture is an option for your cat or dog’s wellness and comfort. It helps treat musculoskeletal, neurological, allergies and metabolic disease.

Acupuncture is the process of inserting needles into body tissues.

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Fear Free New Year

New Years Activity tips for dogs for a Fear Free celebration

Tackling Canine and Feline Frets and Fears During New Year’s Festivities

New Years Activity tips for dogsNew Years festivities can be a time of stress for many dogs and cats. From a pet’s perspective, loud, unpredictable noises and celebratory fireworks explosions are threatening and an understandable cause for alarm. Some animals react as if their very lives hang in the balance. For pets whose people are hosting a party, the presence of strangers and the change in environment — decorations, scented candles or potpourri, furniture moved around — can also be distressing. Thankfully it doesn’t have to be this way. Here are some tips to help your dog or cat keep calm and carry on as they join you in welcoming in the New Year.Continue reading