New Pet Portal and Appointment Scheduler

Is it time for your next appointment? We have changed our customer portal.
Schedule Appointments

If you have an existing account with us, your information should already be ported over. You will need to do a pet look-up and then reset your password. Just click on the button above to get started. If you are new to TLC, you can use this link to set up your account – REGISTER HERE

New Pet Portal

There is No Fooling Around with Heartworm

Buy Heartworm Medication!

It’s sometimes hard to imagine that “an ounce of prevention”…really is worth it. In this case it is. Heart worms are highly invasive and the treatment, once afflicted, adds up quickly.

For the cost of what adds up to be 7 years worth of medication, the treatment is more than your dog and 
your wallet want to go through. The reality is that you 
love your pet and you don’t want to see them go 
through a case of Heartworm. Call to schedule 
a Heartworm test. See our offer to receive 
1/2 OFF your next test.

Mosquito400Brought to you by the Mosquito (Culicidae)
Worms grow over 7 months and usually 
come in multitudes. The worms begin 
with an incubation period inside the
 mosquito. They carry the larvae and 
deliver it to the host, your cat or dog! They can 
grow up to 12 inches and dogs can be infected 
with as many as 250 of them. It’s nasty business
for your dog or cat! This is why we recommend regular testing and most importantly, preventive medication.

 

Fear FREE Certified Professionals

Fear Free Certified professional

Several of our team members have gone through the Fear Free Certified Professional program for Albuquerque Veterinarians. We have adopted a culture of Fear FREE medicine in the clinic and try to add a little TLC into every interaction we have with your pet.

What is Fear Free?

Utilization of Fear Free methods and protocols leads to better healthcare outcomes, satisfied clients and relaxed patients. It also reduces or removes anxiety triggers, which creates an experience that is rewarding and safer for all involved, including your pet(s), you and your veterinary healthcare team.

collie-w-treatsStress can start at home. We encourage you to check out our check-lists to insure that you are doing everything possible to start on the right foot.

Tips for Dogs

Tips for Cats

we practice fear free veterinary medicine

World Rabies Day

World Rabies Day

It’s World Rabies Day –

While rabies is a 100% preventable disease, more than 59,000 people die from the disease around the world each year. World Rabies Day is an opportunity to reflect on our efforts to control this deadly disease and remind ourselves that the fight is not yet over. CDC on Rabies

At TLC Pet Hospital we want to remind you to keep up with your Rabies vaccinations for your pets. This is a requirement of the City of Albuquerque in order to license your pet in the city limits, but it is also important for the health of your pet. No one wants to risk rabies in their pet. Wild animals including squirrels, bats and raccoons can be carriers that can spread the disease to your animals. Rabies infections can lead to death for both pets and humans, so do your part and keep up with your pet’s vaccinations.

Hot Pavement, No Dogs Allowed

Hot Pavement doesn't require hot temperatures

Hot Pavement Doesn’t Require Hot Temperatures

Don’t go out for walks once it gets past 80 degrees. Especially on dark pavement, but gravel trails get just as hot under the New Mexico sun.

Make sure that you have plenty of water for you and your pet. Continue reading

Lyme Disease Prevention Month

It is Lyme Disease Awareness and Prevention

Lyme Disease can have serious negative effects in animals and humans. Long term effects include neurological damage. Here is the link to a fact sheet and crossword puzzle for the kids:

Crossword Puzzle

“Lyme disease is the most common vector-borne disease in the United States. Lyme disease is caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi and rarely, Borrelia mayonii. It is transmitted to humans through the bite of infected blacklegged ticks. Typical symptoms include fever, headache, fatigue, and a characteristic skin rash called erythema migrans. If left untreated, infection can spread to joints, the heart, and the nervous system. Lyme disease is diagnosed based on symptoms, physical findings (e.g., rash), and the possibility of exposure to infected ticks.”

https://www.cdc.gov/lyme/

Tips for Cat Owners for Fear Free Veterinary Care

Preparing your pet for their visit to the Vet

Tips for Cat Owners

  1. We recommend purchasing a carrier that opens from the top and/or has an easily removable top. Pulling or dumping a scared cat from a carrier is stressful.
  2. Place the carrier in a central area of the home at least 3 days prior to your visit. Wipe the carrier with pheromone wipes (Feliway) and place their bed, treats and toys inside. For best results, try keeping the carrier in a quiet location in your home all year round!
  3. When carrying the carrier, use both hands to prevent your cat from being jostled and unbalanced.
  4. When driving, make sure the carrier stays flat and doesn’t tip over.
  5. Cover the carrier to reduce stimuli.
  6. Avoid loud music on the ride over and the way home. Instead, play calming classical music to decrease anxiety.
  7. Speak in a low, calm voice. High pitched praise or reaffirmation often increases anxiety.
  8. If you must wait in the waiting room, face the carrier away from other cats present and place your cat on the seat next to you or on your lap. Never on the floor.
  9. On the day of your visit, if your appointment is in the morning, don’t feed your cat breakfast. If they are hungry, your cat will respond better to food rewards at the veterinary hospital. Cats experience similar endorphin release when eating, like people! (does not apply to diabetic cats.)
  10. If you believe your cat would benefit from an anti-anxiety medication or a natural soothing supplement, please let us know as soon as you arrive.

We hope this helps lessen stress for you and your pet.

we practice fear free veterinary medicine

Tips for Dog Owners for Fear Free Veterinary Care

Preparing your pet for their visit to the Vet

Tips for Dog Owners

  1. aging-dog-and-what-to-doWe recommend purchasing a harness or fixed length leash. This allows more control during what can be a somewhat anxious visit.
  2. Condition them early to enjoy car rides. Start with short drives around the neighborhood. Feed treats and make the experience happy and positive. Add more and more time as they get used to it. If they ever get anxious, stop and try again another day.
  3. On the day of your visit, if their appointment is in the morning, don’t feed them breakfast, and if your appointment is in the afternoon, only feed a small breakfast. If hungry, your dog will respond better to food rewards at the veterinary hospital. Dogs experience similar endorphin release when eating, like people! Does not apply to diabetic dogs.
  4. Bring in their favorite treat, kibble or toy. You are the best at knowing what your dogs go crazy over!
  5. Avoid loud music on the ride over and on the way home. Instead play calming, classical music to decrease anxiety.
  6. Speak in a low calm voice. High pitched praise or reaffirmation often increases anxiety.
  7. If you have an anxious dog, leave them in the car when you arrive and check in with the receptionist. They will advise you when an exam room is available. You can wait in your car, take a walk or sit outside on our bench. Limiting time in the waiting room creates a calmer visit.
  8. If you believe your dog would benefit from an anti-anxiety medication or a natural soothing supplement, please let us know as you arrive.

    We hope this helps lessen stress for you and your pet.

we practice fear free veterinary medicine

 

You Should Never Feed Your Pets…

Chocolate, Coffee, Caffeine: These products all contain substances called methylxanthines, which are found in cacao seeds. Methylxanthines can cause vomiting and diarrhea, panting, excessive thirst and urination, hyperactivity, abnormal heart rhythm, tremors, seizures and even death. Darker chocolate and baking chocolate is more dangerous than milk chocolate.Continue reading