Your Dog Has Diabetes

Diabetes regimen includes a special diet and insulin twice a day

Diabetes Awareness Month “Your Dog Has Diabetes” –

These were not the words I ever thought would come…with a great amount of relief. But, I thought my dog was dying and we had spent the weekend preparing the kids for the worst. Our mid-sized dog suddenly dropped her weight nearly in half. She had been losing weight, but we thought this was a positive result from a change to a healthier diet.

However, she took a turn for the worse and we ended up at TLC, with a dog who had lost 38 pounds.

Two signs stood out in retrospect:

  1. She was drinking a ton of water. (We originally thought that was the food too.)
  2. She became incontinent. She has always been a good dog. She was unable to process all that water and was having accidents every other day.

If your dog is seven or eight and you are not sure you have been feeding them the best food, you should be aware of the signs of diabetes. If you have a breed that is more susceptible, you should be on the watch for signs.

You may want to look into a improving the diet of your aging pets. We have always been healthy eaters ourselves but we didn’t pay a lot of attention to the dog’s diet. And we were guilty of giving them way too many fatty table treats and have found out that many of the store treats were full of sugars.

Just like humans, diet matters to your pet’s health. If you want to improve the overall health of your pet, diet and exercise have to be addressed. Otherwise, you may be looking at our new situation. A by the clock eating schedule of low carb food, followed by an injection of insulin. Twice a day. She is doing great, and actually has looked better for a couple years. We only wish we’d seen the signs sooner.

She had grown so weak that she couldn’t stand  and was so thirsty that she just lay by her water bowl.

Lyme Disease Prevention Month

It is Lyme Disease Awareness and Prevention

Lyme Disease can have serious negative effects in animals and humans. Long term effects include neurological damage. Here is the link to a fact sheet and crossword puzzle for the kids:

Crossword Puzzle

“Lyme disease is the most common vector-borne disease in the United States. Lyme disease is caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi and rarely, Borrelia mayonii. It is transmitted to humans through the bite of infected blacklegged ticks. Typical symptoms include fever, headache, fatigue, and a characteristic skin rash called erythema migrans. If left untreated, infection can spread to joints, the heart, and the nervous system. Lyme disease is diagnosed based on symptoms, physical findings (e.g., rash), and the possibility of exposure to infected ticks.”

https://www.cdc.gov/lyme/

COVID19 UPDATE

4/1

Hello everyone! Thank you all for your understanding and support while we all adjust to the changes that have been brought on. As we continue to evolve with the current pandemic, we would like for everyone to know that we will continue to provide the best medicine possible for your furry family members as well as continue to provide you with the same treatment (as close as possible) that you are accustomed to! We have sent out an email with more details on some recent changes but here are a few things we would like to share.

*We are still at this time open normal business hours and have increased all current sanitation procedures again!

*Please call to schedule an appointment.  There are some appointments that we will need to postpone, but please call us and we can discuss your particular need.!

*Please call the clinic when you arrive for your appointment (or if you are picking up food/medications)

*At this time, we are not permitting clients into our facility.  We will bring your food/medications out to you.  If you are here for an appointment, we will get a history from you about your pet and take your pet into the clinic where our doctors will perform their examination and we will call or come out to explain to you our findings and any needed recommendations.

We are all in this together. We will continue to keep you informed as we change protocols or as regulations change what we are permitted to do. PLEASE call if you have any questions.

Thank you,
The entire TLC Pet Hospital Staff

 

Health Update

Just wanted to let everyone know that we will no longer be performing any elective surgeries for the next few weeks. This includes spays, neuters, declaws, general mass removals and routine dental cleanings. We apologize for any inconvenience this may cause, however, with the short supply of medical supplies, we need to help any way we can to conserve. We appreciate your understanding!

World Rabies Day 9-28-19

World Rabies Day

While rabies is a 100% preventable disease, more than 59,000 people die from the disease around the world each year. World Rabies Day is an opportunity to reflect on our efforts to control this deadly disease and remind ourselves that the fight is not yet over.

cdc.gov/worldrabiesday/

We want to let you know that if you have questions about rabies, its affects and treatments, you can consult your veterinarians here at TLC Pet Hospital. Rabies is a serious disease, only animals who have been vaccinated prior to exposure are treatable. Unvaccinated animals are euthanized.

Dogs, Cats, and Ferrets

Dogs, cats, and ferrets that are currently vaccinated with a USDA-licensed rabies vaccine should be revaccinated immediately, kept under the owner’s control, and observed for 45 days. If the animal under observation develops any signs of illness, it should be evaluated by a veterinarian.

CDC – Caring for animals with exposure