Subcutaneous Fluids – SQ Fluids for your Cat

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Welcome to TLC Pet Hospital’s Kitty Corner. In this video, we learn how to administer SQ Fluids to your feline friend. In this video, we take you step by step through delivering fluids and medication with needle and fluid bag. As part of your at home care for your animal, you may need to administer fluids to your cat or dog. Tent the skin between the shoulder blades. Insert the needle, and open fluids valve. Release fluids into the animal. Close and hold skin in a pinch to keep fluids from draining out. A lump may occur where the fluids are gathered. Replace needle cap.

Tips on Cleaning Your Dog’s Ears

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Needs:

Cotton Balls, Cleaner, Helper, Towel

We will demonstrate how to properly clean your dogs ears. You will need the following:

  • Cotton balls
  • Cleaning solution (available at our clinic)
  • a helper
  • and a little patience

While some dogs may behave through the process, others won’t. Recruit an assistant to help hold your dog’s head still while following the steps.

First, saturate a cotton ball with the cleaning fluid. You may want to squeeze the cotton ball and get some of the fluid into the ear to loosen things up. Then massage the ear to break up any wax or debris, then wipe out the ear canal with the cotton ball.

Once you have dirtied up the cotton, prepare a fresh cotton ball and repeat the wiping out of the ear. Repeat until clean.

For smaller dogs you can place them on a towel on a table or for larger dogs you may want to get set up on the floor.

Let’s review: Wet a cotton ball with cleaning solution, moisten and loosen debris in the ear. Wipe clean. Repeat with fresh cotton.

Thanks for watching this episode of Canine Corner.

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Bringing Home a New Cat for the First time?

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Did you just Adopt a Cat? You need to be prepared. Learn what to do when you are getting a new cat and bringing it home for the first time.
Like a good Scout, Be prepared should be your motto when bringing a new pet into your home. Felines are sensitive to new surroundings and some may hide under a bed or in a closet for days and sometimes even weeks until they feel comfortable with where they landed. You can help your new cat adapt more easily by following these guidelines:

What To Expect – The First 30 

Be Sure To Prepare Before You Bring Your Cat Home:

Cat hiding in a box with round hole

Your Cat May Hide Out for a While

Cats are territorial, and coming into a new environment leaves them feeling unsettled. There are some many unknowns, and they don’t know what may lurk there. Provide a small area to call his own for the first few days or weeks. Put in the space all of the kitty essentials, such as food, water and a litter box. Spend time with your cat, so make sure there’s a comfortable place for you to sit as well.

Fill a litter box with one or two inches of litter and place it in his room where he can use it undisturbed. Set up a feeding station with food and water bowls. Locate it away from the litter box.

“A new cat may hideout for days or weeks before they are comfortable with their new environment.”

Look at your house with a curious cat’s eye view for its climbing and exploring potential. When your cat is acclimated to your home, you may be surprised to find him on top of the upper kitchen cabinets, so make sure there’s nothing on display there or on other high shelves that can be damaged or knocked off. Look for holes or registers that leave ductwork accessible and cover them up. A kitten can easily slither into one of these. Bone up on how to introduce your cat to other pets. Keep her door closed and don’t let your other pets race in unexpectedly.


First Day:

Now, you’re ready to bring your cat home. Preferably, bring him or her home in a cat carrier. It will feel safer to her. Take her directly to her new room.Generally, you should restrict her exposure to the whole family, but of course, everyone is going to want to see the new pet. Remind them of the ground rules you’ve set up.

Sit on the floor and let her come to you. Don’t force her. Just let her get acquainted on her own time. If she doesn’t approach, leave her alone and try again later. Some cats are particularly frightened, and she may retreat to her hidey hole and not come out when you’re around at all. She may only come out at night when the house is quiet. Give her time.

Your newly adopted cat may not eat much or at all at first. It’s best to give your cat the same food she had at the shelter or in her foster home, at least at first. Keeping some things familiar will make her feel more secure. Be sure to change her water frequently and make sure that she is drinking. If your cat hasn’t eaten for a few days, call your vet to ask for advice.

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Small Easter Candies Warning

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Easter Egg hunting is a lot of fun, but loose candies can be hazardous for canine and feline friends. Chocolate is a big time favorite this time of year, but that’s a big no, no for your pets. Small chocolate eggs, chocolate bunnies, there are chocolates in all shapes and sizes. If you are having festive events, have a plan for your animals. An egg hunt combines some of a dogs favorite things. Rummaging around in the yard and treats. Make sure you know what you hid and make sure that everything gets accounted for. Plastics, foils, etc. can also be a problem. It’s best to err on the side of caution for our curious pet friends.

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Brushing Your Dogs Teeth

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Welcome to TLC Pet Hospital’s Pet Corner, we visited TLC Pet Hospital to talk about pet dental health and brushing your dog’s teeth.

We recommend regular Dental Cleanings in combination with frequent brushing of your dog’s teeth and gums. There are water additives, special pet foods and chews that can assist in maintaining healthy teeth and gums. read more →

Weaning

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What Is Weaning?

Weaning is the process of transitioning kittens from mother’s milk to solid food. During weaning, kittens gradually progress from dependence on a mother’s care to social independence. Ideally, weaning is handled entirely by the mother cat. read more →

Hyperthyroidism

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What is hyperthyroidism?

Hyperthyroidism is the most common glandular disorder in cats. It is caused by an excessive concentration of circulating thyroxine—a thyroid hormone better known as T4—in the bloodstream.

What are the symptoms of hyperthyroidism? read more →

Hairballs

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What Are Hairballs?

Most cat owners are familiar with the sight and sound of their kitty producing hairballs. Rid by vomiting, hairballs are common in cats and are usually a byproduct of feline hygiene.

What Causes Hairballs in Cats? read more →

Bad Breath

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What Is Bad Breath?

Bad breath, also known as halitosis, can be caused by a variety of health problems. Don’t worry, your cat’s breath isn’t supposed to smell minty fresh—but if there’s an extremely strong, fetid odor, there could be an underlying medical problem.

What Could Be Causing My Cat’s Bad Breath? read more →

You Should Never Feed Your Pets…

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Chocolate, Coffee, Caffeine: These products all contain substances called methylxanthines, which are found in cacao seeds. Methylxanthines can cause vomiting and diarrhea, panting, excessive thirst and urination, hyperactivity, abnormal heart rhythm, tremors, seizures and even death. Darker chocolate and baking chocolate is more dangerous than milk chocolate. read more →