Autumn Pet Alert – Fall Foods and Treats – Pet Allergies

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Food allergies - pet allergies - dog food allergies

Welcome to TLC Pet Hospital. Keep your pets safe this Halloween. Keep them away from candy and wrappers. Make sure you have a doggie treat just for them.

  • Pet Allergies to food include onions, avocados, grapes and raisins.
  • No Chocolate. Dogs can be made extremely ill by chocolate. Signs may include hyperactivity and vomiting.
  • Pit bull Awareness Day October 28th, 2017.
  • National Cat Day October 29th, 2017.

KEEP THE TREATS AWAY FROM DOGGIES

Pet Allergies - Bad kitty feeds onions and chocolates bad for dogs

Bad Kitty – No Chocolate for the Doggies

Treats, Wrappers and Especially CHOCOLATE need to stay out of dog’s reach to help avoid tummy trouble or an emergency visit to the Vet!

A Quiet Place

If your dog gets anxious around a lot of activity, find a safe quiet place for your pet to be. Soft music and low light can help calm your pet. Make sure they have their toys and blanket.

A Safe Distance

To keep dogs and cats out of trouble, keep them away from the front door either by getting them out of the way or even using a baby/doggie gate to keep them away from trick or treaters. It’s also a good idea to keep cats inside during Halloween, lest they be caught up in mischief.

Pet Allergies

Just Like Vampires Garlic is not good for dogs. Remember anything with chocolate is a no no for dogs. This includes chocolate chip cookies and ice cream. Raisins and Grapes. Avocados are all no, not. Onions, garlic, chives. Different dogs react differently to meats as well. Beef and chicken can often be offenders.

Also onions and garlic are in a lot of dishes, make sure you are not feeding them to your pets.

Fear FREE Certified Professionals

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Fear Free Certified professional

Several of our team members have gone through the Fear Free Certified Professional program for Albuquerque Veterinarians. We have adopted a culture of Fear FREE medicine in the clinic and try to add a little TLC into every interaction we have with your pet.

What is Fear Free?

Utilization of Fear Free methods and protocols leads to better healthcare outcomes, satisfied clients and relaxed patients. It also reduces or removes anxiety triggers, which creates an experience that is rewarding and safer for all involved, including your pet(s), you and your veterinary healthcare team.

collie-w-treatsStress can start at home. We encourage you to check out our check-lists to insure that you are doing everything possible to start on the right foot.

Tips for Dogs

Tips for Cats

we practice fear free veterinary medicine

There is No Fooling Around with Heartworm

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Buy Heartworm Medication!

It’s sometimes hard to imagine that “an ounce of prevention”…really is worth it. In this case it is. Heart worms are highly invasive and the treatment, once afflicted, adds up quickly.

For the cost of what adds up to be 7 years worth of medication, the treatment is more than your dog and 
your wallet want to go through. The reality is that you 
love your pet and you don’t want to see them go 
through a case of Heartworm. Call to schedule 
a Heartworm test. See our offer to receive 
1/2 OFF your next test.

Mosquito400Brought to you by the Mosquito (Culicidae)
Worms grow over 7 months and usually 
come in multitudes. The worms begin 
with an incubation period inside the
 mosquito. They carry the larvae and 
deliver it to the host, your cat or dog! They can 
grow up to 12 inches and dogs can be infected 
with as many as 250 of them. It’s nasty business
for your dog or cat! This is why we recommend regular testing and most importantly, preventive medication.

Heartgard-coupon-apr

Summer Pet Tips

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Fireworks summer vet pet care tips

Some pet care may seem self-evident, but we still like to remind everybody of the basics when it is summertime and you have other things on your mind.

  1. dog-on-a-hikeNever leave a dog or cat in a hot car. Just like with children, leaving your pet in a hot car can quickly have consequences for the animal.
  2. If you wouldn’t walk barefoot on the pavement, neither should your dog. Summer temperatures in July can result in second degree burns on your animals feet. (The same is true of trail hiking with your dog. Make sure the trail is not too hot.)
  3. Make sure you pets have LOTS OF WATER available. Dogs don’t sweat, so make sure they have access to plenty of water.

Change up your routine. Temperatures have been reaching their hottest right at 5:00pm. Take advantage of the cool early morning. Even with the heat, we’ve been cooling down at night. During the hottest parts of the year, try walking your dogs in the morning.

dog playing at party - veterinarian tips

FIREWORKS AND YOUR PETS

Your pet can become very distressed when fireworks and people cause a commotion. If you are entertaining and or celebrating with fireworks this Summer, don’t forget about your furry friends.

  1. Your pet needs a quiet, safe place to be during the festivities. Make them comfortable with some extra pillows or blankets to help reduce the sound around them. If this is not possible, look into letting your pet stay elsewhere during your activities. Let them stay with a friend or think about boarding your dog for the night.
  2. Keep you dog out of the line of fire. It will be your dogs first instinct to chase after fast moving objects. It’s best to keep your dog away from ALL FIREWORKS activities.
  3. WATER – We can’t stress enough, keep your pets hydrated while they are outside in the heat enjoying the day with you.

Tips for Dog Owners for Fear Free Veterinary Care

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Preparing your pet for their visit to the Vet

Tips for Dog Owners

  1. aging-dog-and-what-to-doWe recommend purchasing a harness or fixed length leash. This allows more control during what can be a somewhat anxious visit.
  2. Condition them early to enjoy car rides. Start with short drives around the neighborhood. Feed treats and make the experience happy and positive. Add more and more time as they get used to it. If they ever get anxious, stop and try again another day.
  3. On the day of your visit, if their appointment is in the morning, don’t feed them breakfast, and if your appointment is in the afternoon, only feed a small breakfast. If hungry, your dog will respond better to food rewards at the veterinary hospital. Dogs experience similar endorphin release when eating, like people! Does not apply to diabetic dogs.
  4. Bring in their favorite treat, kibble or toy. You are the best at knowing what your dogs go crazy over!
  5. Avoid loud music on the ride over and on the way home. Instead play calming, classical music to decrease anxiety.
  6. Speak in a low calm voice. High pitched praise or reaffirmation often increases anxiety.
  7. If you have an anxious dog, leave them in the car when you arrive and check in with the receptionist. They will advise you when an exam room is available. You can wait in your car, take a walk or sit outside on our bench. Limiting time in the waiting room creates a calmer visit.
  8. If you believe your dog would benefit from an anti-anxiety medication or a natural soothing supplement, please let us know as you arrive.

    We hope this helps lessen stress for you and your pet.

we practice fear free veterinary medicine

 

Tips on Cleaning Your Dog’s Ears

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Needs:

Cotton Balls, Cleaner, Helper, Towel

We will demonstrate how to properly clean your dogs ears. You will need the following:

  • Cotton balls
  • Cleaning solution (available at our clinic)
  • a helper
  • and a little patience

While some dogs may behave through the process, others won’t. Recruit an assistant to help hold your dog’s head still while following the steps.

First, saturate a cotton ball with the cleaning fluid. You may want to squeeze the cotton ball and get some of the fluid into the ear to loosen things up. Then massage the ear to break up any wax or debris, then wipe out the ear canal with the cotton ball.

Once you have dirtied up the cotton, prepare a fresh cotton ball and repeat the wiping out of the ear. Repeat until clean.

For smaller dogs you can place them on a towel on a table or for larger dogs you may want to get set up on the floor.

Let’s review: Wet a cotton ball with cleaning solution, moisten and loosen debris in the ear. Wipe clean. Repeat with fresh cotton.

Thanks for watching this episode of Canine Corner.

Dog-ear-clean-needs

Bringing Home a New Cat for the First time?

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Did you just Adopt a Cat? You need to be prepared. Learn what to do when you are getting a new cat and bringing it home for the first time.
Like a good Scout, Be prepared should be your motto when bringing a new pet into your home. Felines are sensitive to new surroundings and some may hide under a bed or in a closet for days and sometimes even weeks until they feel comfortable with where they landed. You can help your new cat adapt more easily by following these guidelines:

What To Expect – The First 30 

Be Sure To Prepare Before You Bring Your Cat Home:

Cat hiding in a box with round hole

Your Cat May Hide Out for a While

Cats are territorial, and coming into a new environment leaves them feeling unsettled. There are some many unknowns, and they don’t know what may lurk there. Provide a small area to call his own for the first few days or weeks. Put in the space all of the kitty essentials, such as food, water and a litter box. Spend time with your cat, so make sure there’s a comfortable place for you to sit as well.

Fill a litter box with one or two inches of litter and place it in his room where he can use it undisturbed. Set up a feeding station with food and water bowls. Locate it away from the litter box.

“A new cat may hideout for days or weeks before they are comfortable with their new environment.”

Look at your house with a curious cat’s eye view for its climbing and exploring potential. When your cat is acclimated to your home, you may be surprised to find him on top of the upper kitchen cabinets, so make sure there’s nothing on display there or on other high shelves that can be damaged or knocked off. Look for holes or registers that leave ductwork accessible and cover them up. A kitten can easily slither into one of these. Bone up on how to introduce your cat to other pets. Keep her door closed and don’t let your other pets race in unexpectedly.


First Day:

Now, you’re ready to bring your cat home. Preferably, bring him or her home in a cat carrier. It will feel safer to her. Take her directly to her new room.Generally, you should restrict her exposure to the whole family, but of course, everyone is going to want to see the new pet. Remind them of the ground rules you’ve set up.

Sit on the floor and let her come to you. Don’t force her. Just let her get acquainted on her own time. If she doesn’t approach, leave her alone and try again later. Some cats are particularly frightened, and she may retreat to her hidey hole and not come out when you’re around at all. She may only come out at night when the house is quiet. Give her time.

Your newly adopted cat may not eat much or at all at first. It’s best to give your cat the same food she had at the shelter or in her foster home, at least at first. Keeping some things familiar will make her feel more secure. Be sure to change her water frequently and make sure that she is drinking. If your cat hasn’t eaten for a few days, call your vet to ask for advice.

Learn More

Small Easter Candies Warning

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Easter Egg hunting is a lot of fun, but loose candies can be hazardous for canine and feline friends. Chocolate is a big time favorite this time of year, but that’s a big no, no for your pets. Small chocolate eggs, chocolate bunnies, there are chocolates in all shapes and sizes. If you are having festive events, have a plan for your animals. An egg hunt combines some of a dogs favorite things. Rummaging around in the yard and treats. Make sure you know what you hid and make sure that everything gets accounted for. Plastics, foils, etc. can also be a problem. It’s best to err on the side of caution for our curious pet friends.

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Brushing Your Dogs Teeth

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Welcome to TLC Pet Hospital’s Pet Corner, we visited TLC Pet Hospital to talk about pet dental health and brushing your dog’s teeth.

We recommend regular Dental Cleanings in combination with frequent brushing of your dog’s teeth and gums. There are water additives, special pet foods and chews that can assist in maintaining healthy teeth and gums. read more →

You Should Never Feed Your Pets…

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Chocolate, Coffee, Caffeine: These products all contain substances called methylxanthines, which are found in cacao seeds. Methylxanthines can cause vomiting and diarrhea, panting, excessive thirst and urination, hyperactivity, abnormal heart rhythm, tremors, seizures and even death. Darker chocolate and baking chocolate is more dangerous than milk chocolate. read more →