Taking FEAR FREE to the Next Level

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We’re taking FEAR FREE to the next level to insure that your dogs and cats have the most positive experience they can when visiting the veterinarian.

What is Fear Free?

Several of our team members have gone through the Fear Free Certified Professional program.

Utilization of Fear Free methods and protocols leads to better healthcare, satisfied clients and relaxed patients. It also reduces or removes anxiety triggers, which creates an experience that is rewarding and safer for all involved, including your pet(s), you and your veterinary healthcare team. Read More

Heartworm Special

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Heartworm test - treatment

We are focusing on Heartworm this month and want to remind you to have your animals tested for heartworm and we highly recommend preventatives. This nasty, invasive parasite is introduced usually through a mosquito bite. The treatment is not pleasant for owner or pet. We recommend regular testing and medication to prevent heartworm in the first place. read more →

It’s Customer Appreciation Week 5/14 – 5/20

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join us for pastries and coffee for TLC Customer Appreciation Week

It’s Customer Appreciation Week 5/14 – 5/20

It's Customer Appreciation Week 5/14 - 5/20

Join us every day this week for a special treat for all of our customers.

Everyone who pays a visit to TLC Pet Hospital is a VIP and this week we want to celebrate you. Stop in any day this week for a special treat for our human and animal friends.

FRIDAY – Pastries, Coffee and Juice

THURSDAY – Pastries, Coffee and Juice

WEDNESDAY – Pastries and Coffee

TUESDAY – Donuts and Juice

MONDAY – Cookies and Soda

 

Happy Holidays! The Season Is Full Of Pet Pitfalls

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Merry Christmas - Closed Monday

WE WILL BE CLOSED MONDAY DECEMBER 25th

  • No Chocolate. Dogs can be made extremely ill by chocolate. Signs may include hyperactivity and vomiting.

  • Watch Out for Tinsel and String Both Cats and dogs get into wrappings and trimmings for the tree. Do your best to keep these out of animal’s reach.

  • Visit the Zoo Day December 27

  • Holiday Plants can be toxic to pets


Christmas Tree

Don't let your kitten get into the Christmas TreeThe Christmas tree is  usually the center piece of most of our homes during the holidays. But, we shouldn’t let their beauty cover up the fact that they are still mildly toxic to our animals. With the many species of trees that we bring into our homes, fir tree oil can irritate our pets mouths and stomachs. Symptoms of consumption include excessive drooling or vomiting. Make sure to also clean up tree needles since they’re not the easiest to digest for anyone. Too many needles can cause GI irritation, vomiting, gastrointestinal obstruction or punctures. Be aware your animal won’t be drastically affected if they eat a few fallen pieces from the tree but make sure it’s not a regular snack that may eventually cause serious consequences.

Lilies and Daffodils

Aside from the holiday treats and  baked goods that you’ll be gifted, be aware that any bouquets or plant kits that Woman with her dog at Christmasinclude lilies and daffodils are very harmful to cats and dogs. Plants that are in the lily, Narcissus, and daffodil families are very toxic to our pets. Symptoms include gastrointestinal signs, cardiac arrhythmia, kidney failure, convulsions and even death.

Poinsettia Plant

There have been talks that these red beauties are extremely toxic, however this assumption has been dubbed an urban legend dating back to 1919. The sap of Poinsettias are known to be mildly toxic and irritating, causing nausea or vomiting when consumed but it does not cause death.  So it would still be a good idea to keep your curious four-legged friends away from these holiday bloomers to save them from getting a belly ache.

Mistletoe and Holly

Hanging the mistletoe and holly in your doorway and hard to reach places may not be a bad idea. Even though we adorn both of these holiday trimmings in any spot we need more holiday cheer, both are very toxic for our pets. If you find your fuzzy fellow making these a mid-day snack call your vet or poison control as soon as possible for advice.

Old dog merry Christmas

Autumn Pet Alert – Fall Foods and Treats – Pet Allergies

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Food allergies - pet allergies - dog food allergies

Welcome to TLC Pet Hospital. Keep your pets safe this Halloween. Keep them away from candy and wrappers. Make sure you have a doggie treat just for them.

  • Pet Allergies to food include onions, avocados, grapes and raisins.
  • No Chocolate. Dogs can be made extremely ill by chocolate. Signs may include hyperactivity and vomiting.
  • Pit bull Awareness Day October 28th, 2017.
  • National Cat Day October 29th, 2017.

KEEP THE TREATS AWAY FROM DOGGIES

Pet Allergies - Bad kitty feeds onions and chocolates bad for dogs

Bad Kitty – No Chocolate for the Doggies

Treats, Wrappers and Especially CHOCOLATE need to stay out of dog’s reach to help avoid tummy trouble or an emergency visit to the Vet!

A Quiet Place

If your dog gets anxious around a lot of activity, find a safe quiet place for your pet to be. Soft music and low light can help calm your pet. Make sure they have their toys and blanket.

A Safe Distance

To keep dogs and cats out of trouble, keep them away from the front door either by getting them out of the way or even using a baby/doggie gate to keep them away from trick or treaters. It’s also a good idea to keep cats inside during Halloween, lest they be caught up in mischief.

Pet Allergies

Just Like Vampires Garlic is not good for dogs. Remember anything with chocolate is a no no for dogs. This includes chocolate chip cookies and ice cream. Raisins and Grapes. Avocados are all no, not. Onions, garlic, chives. Different dogs react differently to meats as well. Beef and chicken can often be offenders.

Also onions and garlic are in a lot of dishes, make sure you are not feeding them to your pets.

News Update

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Holidays, Pet Adoptions and Heartworm

Memorial Day

May 29

OFFICES CLOSED

JUNE is American Humane’s Adopt-a-Cat Month®

Thinking of adopting a new Animal? A little preparation can ease a lot of tension when introducing a cat into your home. If there are other pets in the house, make sure your new recruit has a safe quiet place to get used to the smells and sounds of their new place. Slowly introduce their  new roommates.

Pet Appreciation Week
June 4-10
First full week in June

World Pet Memorial Day

June 11

Second Sunday in June

Take Your Dog to Work Day

June 23



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  Heartworm Alert
Remains From Wet Spring

Buy Heartworm Medication to prevent

It’s sometimes hard to imagine that “an ounce of prevention”…really is worth it. In this case it is. Heart worms are highly invasive and the treatment, once afflicted, adds up quickly.  For the cost of what adds up to be 7 years worth of medication, the treatment is more than your dog and your wallet want to go through. The reality is that you love your pet and you don’t want to see them go through a case of Heartworm.

Call to schedule  a Heartworm test. Mosquito400

Brought to you by the Mosquito (Culicidae)

Worms grow over 7 months and usually
come in multitudes. The worms begin
with an incubation period inside the
mosquito. They carry the larvae and
deliver it to the host, your cat or dog! They can
grow up to 12 inches and dogs can be infected
with as many as 250 of them. It’s nasty business
for your dog or cat! This is why we recommend regular testing and most importantly, preventive medication.

PREPARING FOR A NEW CAT

Before You Bring Your Cat Home:

Cats are territorial, and coming into a new home leaves them feeling really uneasy. There’s all that unexplored space, and who knows what may lurk there. Do him a favor and provide a small area to call his own for the first few days or weeks. Furnish the room with cat amenities, such as food, water and a litter box. You’ll want to spend time with your cat, so make sure there’s a comfortable place for you to sit as well.

Fill a litter box with one or two inches of litter and place it in his room where he can use it undisturbed. Set up a feeding station with food and water bowls. Locate it away from the litter box.

Look at your house with a curious cat’s eye view for its climbing and exploring potential. When your cat is acclimated to your home, you may be surprised to find him on top of the upper kitchen cabinets, so make sure there’s nothing on display there or on other high shelves that can be damaged or knocked off. Look for holes or registers that leave ductwork accessible and cover them up. A kitten can easily slither into one of these. Bone up on how to introduce your cat to other pets. Keep her door closed and don’t let your other pets race in unexpectedly.

Finally, set up your first visit with the vet. Read more at tlcpethospital.net

Download Newsletter >>

Thanks for attending our Open House

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Thanks to everyone who visited our open house on Saturday. And a special thank you to Wanagi Wolf Rescue and our sponsors who helped make it a wonderful day.


open-house-sponsors

SAVE THE DATE – OPEN HOUSE!

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Dont forget to join us for our Open House!

TLC-Open-House-Flyer-sponsors-600

Pet Wellness Videos

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Learn more about best practices for keeping your pet healthy. View one of our wellness videos.

More Videos >>

ePet Health Videos >>

We Are Moving Soon

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We are very excited to begin our move in
June to our brand new facility at:

1300 Wyoming NE

It is conveniently located just off I-40 across the street from Kaseman Hospital.