Spring News Update

Categories:

Holidays, Pet Adoptions and Heartworm

Memorial Day

May 29

OFFICES CLOSED

JUNE is American Humane’s Adopt-a-Cat Month®

Thinking of adopting a new Animal? A little preparation can ease a lot of tension when introducing a cat into your home. If there are other pets in the house, make sure your new recruit has a safe quiet place to get used to the smells and sounds of their new place. Slowly introduce their  new roommates.

Pet Appreciation Week
June 4-10
First full week in June

World Pet Memorial Day

June 11

Second Sunday in June

Take Your Dog to Work Day

June 23



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  Heartworm Alert
Remains From Wet Spring

Buy Heartworm Medication to prevent

It’s sometimes hard to imagine that “an ounce of prevention”…really is worth it. In this case it is. Heart worms are highly invasive and the treatment, once afflicted, adds up quickly.  For the cost of what adds up to be 7 years worth of medication, the treatment is more than your dog and your wallet want to go through. The reality is that you love your pet and you don’t want to see them go through a case of Heartworm.

Call to schedule  a Heartworm test. Mosquito400

Brought to you by the Mosquito (Culicidae)

Worms grow over 7 months and usually
come in multitudes. The worms begin
with an incubation period inside the
mosquito. They carry the larvae and
deliver it to the host, your cat or dog! They can
grow up to 12 inches and dogs can be infected
with as many as 250 of them. It’s nasty business
for your dog or cat! This is why we recommend regular testing and most importantly, preventive medication.

PREPARING FOR A NEW CAT

Before You Bring Your Cat Home:

Cats are territorial, and coming into a new home leaves them feeling really uneasy. There’s all that unexplored space, and who knows what may lurk there. Do him a favor and provide a small area to call his own for the first few days or weeks. Furnish the room with cat amenities, such as food, water and a litter box. You’ll want to spend time with your cat, so make sure there’s a comfortable place for you to sit as well.

Fill a litter box with one or two inches of litter and place it in his room where he can use it undisturbed. Set up a feeding station with food and water bowls. Locate it away from the litter box.

Look at your house with a curious cat’s eye view for its climbing and exploring potential. When your cat is acclimated to your home, you may be surprised to find him on top of the upper kitchen cabinets, so make sure there’s nothing on display there or on other high shelves that can be damaged or knocked off. Look for holes or registers that leave ductwork accessible and cover them up. A kitten can easily slither into one of these. Bone up on how to introduce your cat to other pets. Keep her door closed and don’t let your other pets race in unexpectedly.

Finally, set up your first visit with the vet. Read more at tlcpethospital.net

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There is No Fooling Around with Heartworm

Categories:

Buy Heartworm Medication!

It’s sometimes hard to imagine that “an ounce of prevention”…really is worth it. In this case it is. Heart worms are highly invasive and the treatment, once afflicted, adds up quickly.

For the cost of what adds up to be 7 years worth of medication, the treatment is more than your dog and 
your wallet want to go through. The reality is that you 
love your pet and you don’t want to see them go 
through a case of Heartworm. Call to schedule 
a Heartworm test. See our offer to receive 
1/2 OFF your next test.

Mosquito400Brought to you by the Mosquito (Culicidae)
Worms grow over 7 months and usually 
come in multitudes. The worms begin 
with an incubation period inside the
 mosquito. They carry the larvae and 
deliver it to the host, your cat or dog! They can 
grow up to 12 inches and dogs can be infected 
with as many as 250 of them. It’s nasty business
for your dog or cat! This is why we recommend regular testing and most importantly, preventive medication.

Heartgard-coupon-apr

Tips for Cat Owners for Fear Free Veterinary Care

Categories:

Preparing your pet for their visit to the Vet

Tips for Cat Owners

  1. We recommend purchasing a carrier that opens from the top and/or has an easily removable top. Pulling or dumping a scared cat from a carrier is stressful.
  2. Place the carrier in a central area of the home at least 3 days prior to your visit. Wipe the carrier with pheromone wipes (Feliway) and place their bed, treats and toys inside. For best results, try keeping the carrier in a quiet location in your home all year round!
  3. When carrying the carrier, use both hands to prevent your cat from being jostled and unbalanced.
  4. When driving, make sure the carrier stays flat and doesn’t tip over.
  5. Cover the carrier to reduce stimuli.
  6. Avoid loud music on the ride over and the way home. Instead, play calming classical music to decrease anxiety.
  7. Speak in a low, calm voice. High pitched praise or reaffirmation often increases anxiety.
  8. If you must wait in the waiting room, face the carrier away from other cats present and place your cat on the seat next to you or on your lap. Never on the floor.
  9. On the day of your visit, if your appointment is in the morning, don’t feed your cat breakfast. If they are hungry, your cat will respond better to food rewards at the veterinary hospital. Cats experience similar endorphin release when eating, like people! (does not apply to diabetic cats.)
  10. If you believe your cat would benefit from an anti-anxiety medication or a natural soothing supplement, please let us know as soon as you arrive.

We hope this helps lessen stress for you and your pet.

Tips for Dog Owners for Fear Free Veterinary Care

Categories:

Preparing your pet for their visit to the Vet

Tips for Dog Owners

  1. aging-dog-and-what-to-doWe recommend purchasing a harness or fixed length leash. This allows more control during what can be a somewhat anxious visit.
  2. Condition them early to enjoy car rides. Start with short drives around the neighborhood. Feed treats and make the experience happy and positive. Add more and more time as they get used to it. If they ever get anxious, stop and try again another day.
  3. On the day of your visit, if their appointment is in the morning, don’t feed them breakfast, and if your appointment is in the afternoon, only feed a small breakfast. If hungry, your dog will respond better to food rewards at the veterinary hospital. Dogs experience similar endorphin release when eating, like people! Does not apply to diabetic dogs.
  4. Bring in their favorite treat, kibble or toy. You are the best at knowing what your dogs go crazy over!
  5. Avoid loud music on the ride over and on the way home. Instead play calming, classical music to decrease anxiety.
  6. Speak in a low calm voice. High pitched praise or reaffirmation often increases anxiety.
  7. If you have an anxious dog, leave them in the car when you arrive and check in with the receptionist. They will advise you when an exam room is available. You can wait in your car, take a walk or sit outside on our bench. Limiting time in the waiting room creates a calmer visit.
  8. If you believe your dog would benefit from an anti-anxiety medication or a natural soothing supplement, please let us know as you arrive.

    We hope this helps lessen stress for you and your pet.

 

Play It Cool When It Comes to the Holidays

Categories:

Play It Cool When It Comes To Pets,
The Holidays are full of pet pitfallsmistletoe

  • No Chocolate. Dogs can be made extremely ill by chocolate. Signs may include hyperactivity and vomiting.
  • Watch Out for Tinsel and String Both Cats and dogs get into wrappings and trimmings for the tree. Do your best to keep these out of animal’s reach.
  • National Mutt Day December 2
    World Wildlife Conservation Day December 4
    Visit the Zoo Day December 27
  • Holiday Plants can be toxic to pets 

read more →

Subcutaneous Fluids – SQ Fluids for your Cat

Categories:


Welcome to TLC Pet Hospital’s Kitty Corner. In this video, we learn how to administer SQ Fluids to your feline friend. In this video, we take you step by step through delivering fluids and medication with needle and fluid bag. As part of your at home care for your animal, you may need to administer fluids to your cat or dog. Tent the skin between the shoulder blades. Insert the needle, and open fluids valve. Release fluids into the animal. Close and hold skin in a pinch to keep fluids from draining out. A lump may occur where the fluids are gathered. Replace needle cap.

Tips on Cleaning Your Dog’s Ears

Categories:

Needs:

Cotton Balls, Cleaner, Helper, Towel

We will demonstrate how to properly clean your dogs ears. You will need the following:

  • Cotton balls
  • Cleaning solution (available at our clinic)
  • a helper
  • and a little patience

While some dogs may behave through the process, others won’t. Recruit an assistant to help hold your dog’s head still while following the steps.

First, saturate a cotton ball with the cleaning fluid. You may want to squeeze the cotton ball and get some of the fluid into the ear to loosen things up. Then massage the ear to break up any wax or debris, then wipe out the ear canal with the cotton ball.

Once you have dirtied up the cotton, prepare a fresh cotton ball and repeat the wiping out of the ear. Repeat until clean.

For smaller dogs you can place them on a towel on a table or for larger dogs you may want to get set up on the floor.

Let’s review: Wet a cotton ball with cleaning solution, moisten and loosen debris in the ear. Wipe clean. Repeat with fresh cotton.

Thanks for watching this episode of Canine Corner.

Dog-ear-clean-needs

Bringing Home a New Cat for the First time?

Categories:

Did you just Adopt a Cat? You need to be prepared. Learn what to do when you are getting a new cat and bringing it home for the first time.
Like a good Scout, Be prepared should be your motto when bringing a new pet into your home. Felines are sensitive to new surroundings and some may hide under a bed or in a closet for days and sometimes even weeks until they feel comfortable with where they landed. You can help your new cat adapt more easily by following these guidelines:

What To Expect – The First 30 

Be Sure To Prepare Before You Bring Your Cat Home:

Cat hiding in a box with round hole

Your Cat May Hide Out for a While

Cats are territorial, and coming into a new environment leaves them feeling unsettled. There are some many unknowns, and they don’t know what may lurk there. Provide a small area to call his own for the first few days or weeks. Put in the space all of the kitty essentials, such as food, water and a litter box. Spend time with your cat, so make sure there’s a comfortable place for you to sit as well.

Fill a litter box with one or two inches of litter and place it in his room where he can use it undisturbed. Set up a feeding station with food and water bowls. Locate it away from the litter box.

“A new cat may hideout for days or weeks before they are comfortable with their new environment.”

Look at your house with a curious cat’s eye view for its climbing and exploring potential. When your cat is acclimated to your home, you may be surprised to find him on top of the upper kitchen cabinets, so make sure there’s nothing on display there or on other high shelves that can be damaged or knocked off. Look for holes or registers that leave ductwork accessible and cover them up. A kitten can easily slither into one of these. Bone up on how to introduce your cat to other pets. Keep her door closed and don’t let your other pets race in unexpectedly.


First Day:

Now, you’re ready to bring your cat home. Preferably, bring him or her home in a cat carrier. It will feel safer to her. Take her directly to her new room.Generally, you should restrict her exposure to the whole family, but of course, everyone is going to want to see the new pet. Remind them of the ground rules you’ve set up.

Sit on the floor and let her come to you. Don’t force her. Just let her get acquainted on her own time. If she doesn’t approach, leave her alone and try again later. Some cats are particularly frightened, and she may retreat to her hidey hole and not come out when you’re around at all. She may only come out at night when the house is quiet. Give her time.

Your newly adopted cat may not eat much or at all at first. It’s best to give your cat the same food she had at the shelter or in her foster home, at least at first. Keeping some things familiar will make her feel more secure. Be sure to change her water frequently and make sure that she is drinking. If your cat hasn’t eaten for a few days, call your vet to ask for advice.

Learn More

Small Easter Candies Warning

Categories:

Easter Egg hunting is a lot of fun, but loose candies can be hazardous for canine and feline friends. Chocolate is a big time favorite this time of year, but that’s a big no, no for your pets. Small chocolate eggs, chocolate bunnies, there are chocolates in all shapes and sizes. If you are having festive events, have a plan for your animals. An egg hunt combines some of a dogs favorite things. Rummaging around in the yard and treats. Make sure you know what you hid and make sure that everything gets accounted for. Plastics, foils, etc. can also be a problem. It’s best to err on the side of caution for our curious pet friends.

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Brushing Your Dogs Teeth

Categories:

Welcome to TLC Pet Hospital’s Pet Corner, we visited TLC Pet Hospital to talk about pet dental health and brushing your dog’s teeth.

We recommend regular Dental Cleanings in combination with frequent brushing of your dog’s teeth and gums. There are water additives, special pet foods and chews that can assist in maintaining healthy teeth and gums. read more →